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5 Brands You Think Are Eco…But Really Aren’t

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By Arwa Lodhi

Ok, we were raised with the command: ‘if you don’t have anything nice to say, best not to say anything at all’, but after reading again and again about these brands in various eco-fashion publications, we here at Eluxe felt it was time to speak up.

We’re sure these names below are brands you think are eco friendly because they make green claims–however, these are often false, while others have marketed themselves as eco-friendly, but are no better than the average company.

To be fair, defining a true eco-friendliness difficult–even if a company creates fashion from all-organic fibres and vegetable colours, if they’re fuelling their operations with dirty diesel or coal, and then air-freighting the final products out to global markets, is that more sustainable than a brand that uses non-organic cotton but energises their factory with wind power? If a beauty brand uses only recyclable materials in their packaging and donates some profits to green charities, can they still be considered ‘green’ if their makeup is loaded with harmful chemicals?

Ultimately, it’s you who decides, but to better make such decisions, we’d like to present some information below that you might find very interesting indeed….

Lush Handmade Cosmetics whatTOdo Mississauga 2

1. LUSH Cosmetics

Lush love using environmental causes in their marketing. In fact, they used to supply the Body Shop with cosmetics in the 80s, and they’ve worked with Vivienne Westwood (see below) on the Climate Change Revolution campaign, and are renowned for crazy publicity stunts, like doing ‘animal testing’ on a live, naked woman.

Through these activities, combined with Lush’s policy of not testing on animals (now illegal throughout the EU anyway) and their ‘corner-deli food-container’ types of packaging, many believe this is an eco-friendly brand, almost pure enough to eat. However, many of their products are packed with harmful preservatives, including parabens and ‘parfum’, that nebulous, obscure ingredient that can serve as a euphemism for myriad nasties. In fact, their ‘parfums’ are so strong, you can literally smell them from outside on the street–there’s no way anything natural can penetrate the city air outside Lush’s shops like that. On their website, the company makes their excuses for the use of these chemicals, but with so many totally natural brands out there, it’s very hard indeed to justify the use of chemicals anymore, especially when a company markets itself using words like ‘fresh’ and ‘natural’ all the time.

What’s more, despite their strong position against animal testing, 33% of their products are still not suitable for vegans–in other words, they contain animal products. As for waste, their shop floors are full of ‘raw’ soaps and ‘deli’ type bins full of ‘freshly made’ creams and masks, giving the impression that Lush uses almost no packaging at all. However, customers have to do the dirty work, putting their products in plastic tubs to buy them, and even when the ‘raw’ bath bombs and soaps are purchased, they too are put into a clear little cellophane bag at the counter. Then that is put into a paper bag, and a copy of Lush’s newspaper/marketing tool, the Lush Times  is included in the bag. So in short, you leave with a load of packaging, but are under the illusion when you walk in that almost none is used. Nice trick, Lush!

bs-the-body-shop-33858890-450-296

2. The Body Shop

Founded way back in 1976 by Anita Roddick, The Body Shop was one of the first companies to decry animal testing and to use Fair Trade, natural ingredients in some of their products. The Body Shop also champions various social causes and supports developing communities by their purchasing hemp, Shea butter and other locally harvested products. But the good news ends there.

Today, like most big cosmetic companies, the Body Shop’s beauty range is full petrochemicals, synthetic colours, fragrances and preservatives, and in many of their products they use only tiny amounts of botanically-based ingredients. Most of their goods come in plastic tubs or containers, and most scarily of all, they  irradiate certain products to kill microbes; obviously, radiation is generated from dangerous non-renewable uranium, which cannot be disposed of safely. Yipes!

London-Fashion-Week-W-2009-Vivienne-Westwood

3. Vivienne Westwood

Her Climate Change Revolution calls on consumers to buy less, and links the capitalist economy to the destruction of the planet. She has created a line of bags manufactured in Africa to help empower women there, and designed eco-friendly uniforms for the staff of Virgin air.

These are all commendable activities, yet Dame Westwood has done very little that we could discover to make her own brands more eco-friendly. From Anglomania to Red Label, from men’s wear to accessories, her clothes are often made from petroleum byproducts and worse, PVC; she cannot guarantee her designs are not manufactured in sweatshops and or don’t contain toxic dyes. Rank-a-Brand even gives her the lowest possible score for environmental friendliness and transparency, yet loads of ‘ethical fashion’ magazines laud her for being a ‘sustainable brand,’ mainly because she is vocal about climate change.

To put this into perspective, Shell was a long-time sponsor of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition and exhibition, with the aim of raising awareness of the threats faced by animals, plants and habitats–does that make them a ‘sustainable brand’?

stel2

4. Stella McCartney

Stella loves animals, make no mistake. As a proud PETA member, there’s no way you’re ever going to find leather or fur in any of  her designs, ever. But…how does that make her line sustainable?

Take a look at anything–anything! on a rack right now with a Stella McCartney tag on it, and check the label. What’s it made of? Organic cotton? Silk? Cashmere? While her clothing may have some of the above in the blend, every single piece we checked at Le Bon Marche in Paris also contained polyester or nylon–and don’t even get us started on her plasticky ‘faux leathers‘.

If you check the Sustainability section of her website, there’s a lot of talk about how friendly she is to animals, then there’s a link to her ‘eco friendly’ products, but even these contain many non-Earth friendly materials. If you want biodegradable soles for shoes, why not just use cork, Stella? And as for those sunglasses made from ‘natural’ plastic, so energy-intensive to produce, why not just create them from sustainable, biodegradable wood?

The media doesn’t help matters: Stella is often lauded as being ‘the reigning queen of mainstream eco-fashion’. Elle Magazine, for example, says Stella ‘actively works to include organic, naturally sourced, and low-impact ingredients whenever possible’, ignoring the fact that if you really care about the environment, using such ingredients is always possible.

 

5. Korres

It’s a hugely popular brand that’s readily available around the world. But Korres claims of being a ‘natural’ brand could not be further from the truth. Owned by chemical giant Johnson and Johnson doesn’t help this brand’s green cred. Sure, some formulations are approaching 90 per cent plus natural and naturally-derived ingredients, but other products contain a lot more in terms of nasty chemicals. Here’s but a few ingredients from their Tinted Red Grape SPF 50 Cream:

Ethylhexyl Methoxycinnamate, Dibutyl Adipate, Octocrylene, Bis-Ethylhexyloxyphenol Methoxyphenyl Triazine, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Butyl Methoxydibenzoylmethane, Glycerin, Distarch Phosphate, Glyceryl Stearate Citrate, Polyglyceryl-3 Stearate, Alcohol Denat., Hydrogenated Lecithin, Alcohol, Caprylyl Glycol, CI 77491/Iron Oxides, CI 77492/Iron Oxides, CI 77499/Iron Oxides, CI 77891/Titanium Dioxide, Parfum/Fragrance, Phenoxyethanol, Polyacrylate Crosspolymer-6, Polysorbate 80, Sodium Benzoate, Sodium Carboxymethyl Beta-Glucan, Sodium Citrate, Soy Isoflavones, Tetrahydrodiferuloylmethane, Tetrasodium Glutamate Diacetate

Sorry, but how can a cream containing all those chemicals possibly call itself ‘natural’? Not only that, but the cream contained glycerin, which can dry skin from the inside out, 2 forms of alcohol, which, needless to say, may not be toxic, but is certainly drying on the skin, parfum/fragrance, which can literally be any toxin a brand chooses (these ingredients are dubbed a ‘trade secret’ and needn’t be specified).

Hate to say it, but what do you expect from a company whose parent company puts sodium laureth sulfates in baby products?

……………………………………………………………………………………………

It’s all very well when companies donate money to charity. But let’s not forget that’s also a huge tax write off for them. When they highlight social or environmental problems, that’s a great service to society, but a bit dodgy is it’s also a company’s main marketing strategy, while they practice the same behaviour they preach against. If they implement some ‘green’ policies, that’s always welcome, but their overall strategy and eco-record has to be considered too.

Given that a handful of companies are busting a gut trying to do all that, plus use green manufacturing techniques and materials, don’t you think we owe it to these good people to ‘out’ those brands that could do much better?

 

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35 Comments

  • Reply
    Style is ethical fashion
    Jun 6, 2013 at 3:27 pm

    A really interesting post. It can sometimes be difficult to see past the clever marketing and I will have to say I am genuinely quite surprised about Lush, a company that I considered to make products that are free of harmful chemicals.

  • Reply
    Stacy H. [The Conscience Collective]
    Jun 14, 2013 at 1:42 pm

    Very interesting! I think there will always be an issue when we confuse ethical fashion with ‘eco’ fashion. For example, Eden Diodati focuses on one of the two main branches of ethical fashion–this being the social and NOT environmental, which ‘eco’ implies.

  • Reply
    Design and social ethics
    Jun 14, 2013 at 7:08 pm

    Eden Diodati have been working pretty tirelessly to create a sustainable brand not just in donating profits to charity and philanthropy but in manufacturing luxury fashion through a non-profit organisation helping mentally and physically disabled women. This is almost unheard of in the luxury fashion world. They don’t make clutches so I question the writer’s accuracy and also the judgement to attack a start-up brand for having so offended you as to not “get back to you.” the “stingray” is merely an embossed pattern. I know the girl who founded it and she works really hard.

    • Reply
      Chere
      Jun 14, 2013 at 9:52 pm

      Thanks for your message.
      We did already laud the company for their philanthropic work, but that does not make them an eco brand. Our writer was not offended the company did not answer her email; the point was she tried to clarify whether Eden Diodati’s gold, cobochon and leather (stingray or not) was ethically sourced and non-toxic, and whether the dyes used were eco-friendly–the inquiry was made initially we loved the brand and wanted to cover it. However, no info we could find would confirm the brand as being eco-friendly.

  • Reply
    Robyn P.
    Mar 23, 2014 at 12:39 am

    Yes, I do think we owe it to the good people and companies to ‘out’ those brands! Another great article 🙂

  • Reply
    a concerned Lushie
    Dec 15, 2015 at 3:43 pm

    I work for a Lush shop in the UK and the majority of the things you’ve mentioned either do not apply here (where Lush was founded) or are not properly explained. In the UK the ‘naked’ products: bath bombs, bubble bars, are delivered to our stores in cardboard boxes (which we recycle). When purchased by a customer we put the item into a recycled & recyclable paper bag and seal it with a sticker. The soaps are cut into chunks and when purchased, wrapped in greaseproof to protect them. (still no plastic bags!) If you buy a ‘naked’ product that is put into a black pot then you should know that these pots are post consumer recycled, so they aren’t just made from leftovers in a factory, they are made from recycled pots. We recycle them in store and offer a free face mask as a reward for returning 5 black pots. The clear bottles for shampoos and toothy tabs can be recycled at home along with plastic drinks bottles etc. We don’t offer plastic bags at all, if you purchase a large gift they are put into a cardboard box with handles.
    The ‘animal product’ that stops a percentage of our products from being vegan is honey, so it’s not as horrific as you want it to sound. Animal testing isn’t illegal in the EU. Animal testing on finished products is illegal. So we couldn’t test a shampoo, but could still test all the individual ingredients on animals. There’s an EU regulation called REACH that is threatening Lush’s ability to buy raw ingredients without them having been tested on animals by someone. That’s what we’re fighting against.
    Also, on the Lush website they are very clear and honest about ingredients. The natural ingredients are listed in green, and the safe synthetics are listed in black. A lot of the time the ‘parfum’ that you think is so terrifying is listed in green which means it is natural. There are so many natural ingredients that smell very strong (esp. when concentrated) that it doesn’t surprise me at all that you can smell it outside the shop! Where safe synthetics are used, there is a valid reason. I had a lengthy conversation with a customer who wondered why we use sodium lauryl sulphate in our shampoos as a lathering agent. I did some research at home and discovered that tests have been done (outside of Lush) that suggested that the natural alternative was an irritant to more people that sodium lauryl sulphate.

    Just thought I’d go into further detail for those who instantly believe everything they read on the internet.

    • Reply
      Lebron
      Dec 17, 2016 at 7:05 pm

      I disagree with you. How do you explain Lush using quite a bit of SLS in most of its products, or since when glycerin soap become eco friendly. Also, Packaging in plastic or cello bags ( after purchase) is eco friendly and paper is not? at least paper is biodegradable. i like lush , but whole misleading marketing irritates me. SLS is a very dangerous drug that causes cancer!!!

    • Reply
      Chere
      Apr 23, 2017 at 1:09 pm

      Actually, your comment is full of inaccuracies: first animal testing of cosmetics IS illegal in the EU https://ec.europa.eu/growth/sectors/cosmetics/animal-testing_en. Secondly, as for the ‘parfum’ from Lush’s products, sorry – there is no way even high concentrations of natural oils can smell up a city street like that, and since Lush refuses to reveal what they’re using as their fragrance, we have no idea whether those are natural oils or not. But even if they ARE using 100% concentrated essential oils, those can be highly irritating to skin, so it’s best to list those who may be allergic. Finally, the fact that their soaps and shampoos are packed with SLS is inexcusable. There are loads of wonderful shampoo brands that are much gentler and more natural that don’t use this detergent: https://eluxemagazine.com/beauty/top-5-organic-shampoos/

  • Reply
    Carla Wessels
    Mar 28, 2016 at 3:58 pm

    Some of the statements made about LUSH cosmetics is simply not true. I know this first hand, as I have been a customer for many years and have also worked for the company previously for two years. Firstly none of the products are packaged in cellophane bags. All bath bombs and naked products are packaged in a compostable little bag. I remember long days standing in the LUSH kitchen washing out old black pots, returned by customers, so we could use them again for future packaging.

    Secondly none of the packaging requires the customer to put anything into a tub. The freshly made face masks are the only thing packaged into a tub on site and this is done by staff.

    Also the 33% of products not suitable for vegans only contain honey. A great natural product with many benefits for your skin and health. The honey used is in fact badger friendly and the bee’s are in no ways harmed by the process.

    Yes, Parabens and SLS is still found in some of their products, but they have been researching new formula’s and recipes and add new paraben/sls-free versions to their range every year.

    No company is beyond scrutiny, but it is naive and ignorant to call out companies who are putting a substantial effort into changing the norms of body products and cosmetics. Why judge, when we can encourage them to do better.

    • Reply
      Chere
      Mar 29, 2016 at 2:35 pm

      Thanks for your comment Carla. However, I can tell you from first hand experience that at the shop near my house in Paris at least, the bath bombs are cello wrapped and there are tubs surrounding a bunch of products that are on ice that you can scoop into small or large tubs. I am sure different stores have different policies. The reason Lush is on the list is because they claim to be 100% natural and eco, etc, but the chemicals they use in their products are pretty harsh: not just parabens and SLS, but the fragrance and parfums are so strong and artificial they can be smelled from blocks away – this is not ok for a brand that calls itself ‘natural’ in our opinion.

  • Reply
    Lex
    Apr 25, 2016 at 6:45 am

    Does anyone know what year this entire article was posted in? I am trying to cite this for a paper I am writing.
    If anyone can please let me know, that would be really helpful.
    Thank you!

    • Reply
      Chere
      Apr 25, 2016 at 10:35 am

      August 2015 Lex

  • Reply
    Blanche
    Feb 15, 2017 at 4:53 am

    Hello, thanks a lot. This post is very interesting but Which brand is good? Ecology certification? Vegan? Which? Thanks

    • Reply
      Chere
      Feb 15, 2017 at 3:30 pm

      Hey Blanche! The answer to that could fit into a book! Or…a website! 🙂 Please search through our fashion and beauty sections – you can find loads of absolutely amazing brands, all of which are ethical and sustainable

  • Reply
    Brittany
    Apr 23, 2017 at 8:34 am

    Lush doesn’t claim to be 100% natural. You are spreading a lot of false info. Lush has a we believe statement on their walls, catalogs, websites and even some of the reusable totes . That “we believe statement” talks about the use of safe synthetics. Lush does say they use fresh, natural ingredients in all their products- because they do us natural ingredients. They ALSO use safe synthetics. Lush also uses such minimal amounts of parables that legally it doesn’t even need to be listed on the ingredient label (lots of the so called natural products do in fact have parabens but Law only requires it to be listed if it surpasses a certain amount.) lush just happens to be honest and transparent enough to tell you every single thing in each product. The perfume you mention because “fake” also untrue. They are a blend of essential oils. They aren’t going to make it easier for companies to steal their product inventions and fragrances (because it happens frequently) so they the perfume are in fact the essential components of essential oils in the product. Which is why 98% of the time “perfume” is listed in green.

    • Reply
      Chere
      Apr 23, 2017 at 1:22 pm

      That’s a bit misleading, Brittany. A quick look at their website and you can see that Fragrance is one of the first three ingredients in most products, and it is NEVER, EVER in green. The essential oils used ARE listed – not such a big secret after all! http://www.lushusa.com/bath/bath-bombs/which-came-first%3F-%28spots%29/07211.html The worst thing about these (very obviously) chemical fragrances is that unlike other products like perfume that contain them, with Lush’s products, you are literally soaking in that crap! Parabens are illegal in the EU, so I assume their products here don’t have them, but why should European customers benefit from safer cosmetics than others? All cosmetics companies – not just Lush – have to change their formulations to comply with EU law. So why don’t they just cut out the parabens for the American market, too? Lush also uses a LOT of SLS (a strong, irritating detergent) in their shampoos and soaps. There’s no need for that when there are plenty of much gentler alternatives out there https://eluxemagazine.com/beauty/top-5-organic-shampoos/. Whatever the brand may say about not being fully natural, the impression their marketing strategy gives is quite another one – the footer on their website exclaims things like Naked Packaging (though it’s far from that, read above), Freshest Cosmetics (whatever that means!) etc. to give the impression (and in marketing terms, impressions are everything!) that the company is ‘natural’. Plus, if you ask someone to name an all natural brand, they will likely answer Lush. And that’s a shame, because by using SLS, Fragrance and parabens, they are far from that. Their green cred is way, way lower than other brands like Rahua, Odylique, Green People, etc. and it’s just wrong that people don’t recognise that.

  • Reply
    Shelia
    Jun 29, 2017 at 10:13 am

    Chere, you are quite awesome! We consumers are very lucky to have an eco, green, non-toxic advocate telling the truth and pushing change for the better, for our lives, with such passion. Thank you so very much!

    • Reply
      Chere
      Jun 29, 2017 at 5:45 pm

      Aw! Sweet of you to say! Thank you!

  • Reply
    Katie MacKinnon
    Jul 4, 2017 at 4:06 pm

    In the UK Lush don’t put any of their products into plasic bags at the counter, I think that’s just in America. When I was in the US staying with my boyfriend’s parents I ordered a few things from Lush online, and was surprised when they arrived wrapped in plastic and packed with polystyrine. In the UK Lush orders comes wrapped in paper and packed with popcorn! I think your packaging laws must be different or something.

    • Reply
      Jenna
      Dec 16, 2017 at 4:27 am

      As someone who works at LUSH, I can say they we definitely do not wrap anything in plastic at the counters! At least as long as I’ve been shopping from/working at LUSH we haven’t in California. Even everything that comes in shipments is 100% recyclable! As for what you might have thought were polystyrene packing peanuts were actually a compostable packing peanut they use that’s made from starch! https://www.lushusa.com/Stories-Article?cid=article_go-with-the-ecoflo

      • Reply
        Chere
        Dec 16, 2017 at 4:32 am

        Hi Jenna! That could well be because California has banned plastic bags and packaging by all companies 😉

  • Reply
    Singse
    Jul 9, 2017 at 8:20 am

    Thanks for your post and it is very interesting.. but I’m more confused than ever.
    Do you know if there is such a thing that is 100% natural and good without any trace of “bad”?? Is that even realistic to expect that?
    What would you recommend us consumers using then? I’d really appreciate your follow-up article on this since your standards seem very high… (not trying to be sarcastic here… just really wanting to do the right thing by the environment, but feel very lost… etc.. )

    • Reply
      Chere
      Jul 9, 2017 at 5:49 pm

      Hi Singse

      You are right – no brand can ever be without a trace of ‘bad’! But many people think these brands are green because they market them as such. The Body Shop’s products are chock full of harmful chemicals. Lush is improving their formulae, but still sell stuff in plastic tubs – the fact that you can fill them yourself doesn’t change that – and their products are also far from natural – they contain loads of chemical fragrances and preservatives. There are way more natural beauty brands on the market! 🙂 As for Stella, she is at least consistently vegan, but her clothes and bags are often made from petrol based sources. Ditto Westwood – in fact, there’s nothing eco about her brand AT ALL – she uses tons of leather too, so it’s not even vegan friendly. Bottom line: any brand we feature in Eluxe will be more ethical and eco than these five 😉

  • Reply
    Emma
    Oct 2, 2017 at 11:19 pm

    How did Lush supply The Body Shop with cosmetics in the 80s if Lush wasn’t founded until 1995?

    • Reply
      Anna
      Oct 31, 2017 at 11:14 pm

      Now THAT is a question for the author to answer.

    • Reply
      Lynn
      Feb 20, 2018 at 6:01 pm

      Cosmetics To Go, the company that essentially became/spawned Lush, was the supplier for The Body Shop. Much of the information in this article is incorrect or misleading, and doing some reading of your own from Lush – who are extremely transparent – will fill you in on what is/is not correct in this article. Sounds to me that this shop at which she shops is not following company guidelines, and this should not be used as the standard for judging the entire brand. Also, Lush is light years beyond MOST other brands, and this article is really reaching to make them look negative, but it just doesn’t hold up. P.S. Natural doesn’t always mean better! See: https://uk.lush.com/ingredients/synthetic-mica Cheers!

  • Reply
    Denise Benoit
    Jun 21, 2018 at 1:30 pm

    Modern consumers are drowning in an ocean of scammers and corruption.

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    IN NO EVENT SHALL ELUXE OR ITS SUBSIDIARIES, AFFILIATES, AGENTS, SUPPLIERS, VENDORS, MANUFACTURERS OR DISTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, PUNITIVE, INCIDENTAL, EXEMPLARY OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF USE, DATA, REVENUE OR PROFITS, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, OR LOSS OF BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY OR GOODWILL, ARISING FROM OR IN CONNECTION WITH (A) THE USE OF, OR INABILITY TO USE, THE SITE; (B) THE PROVISION OF OR FAILURE TO PROVIDE SERVICES, PRODUCTS, MATERIALS, CONTENT, OR SOFTWARE AVAILABLE FROM, ON OR THROUGH THE SITE OR ANY THIRD-PARTY WEBSITE(S); OR (C) THE CONDUCT OF OTHER USERS OF THE SITE, WHETHER BASED ON CONTRACT, TORT, NEGLIGENCE, STRICT LIABILITY OR OTHERWISE, EVEN IF ELUXE MAGAZINE HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. YOU ASSUME COMPLETE RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR USE OF THE SITE. YOUR SOLE REMEDY AGAINST TGT FOR DISSATISFACTION WITH THE SITE OR ANY CONTENT IS TO STOP USING THE WEBSITE. THAT SAID, IF ELUXE MAGAZINE IS FOUND TO BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR ANY DAMAGE OR LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR WHICH IS IN ANY WAY CONNECTED WITH YOUR USE OF THE SITE, ANY CONTENT, OR PURCHASE OF ANY PRODUCTS OR SERVICES ON OR THROUGH THE SITE, ELUXE MAGAZINE’S LIABILITY SHALL NOT EXCEED $100.00 IN THE AGGREGATE.

    These Terms of Service (together with our Privacy Policy, which is expressly incorporated herein by reference and which can be accessed on this Site, and any other terms that may appear on the Site from time-to-time) contain the entire understanding between you and us with respect to your use and access of this Site, and supersede all prior agreements, terms, conditions and understandings, both written and oral, with respect to such use and access of the Site. No representation, statement or inducement, whether oral or written, not contained in these Terms of Service (and any other terms that may appear on the Site from time-to-time) or the Privacy Policy shall bind any party to this agreement. No additional or different terms or conditions will be binding upon us unless expressly agreed to in writing by an officer of ELUXE MAGAZINE. No other representative has any authority to waive, alter, vary or add to these Terms of Service. Before using this Site please read through all referenced documents carefully.

    Aggregate information (non-personally identifiable information)

    Eluxe Magazine may, from time to time, automatically collect aggregate information about our visitors to our advertisers, sponsors, promotional partners and affiliates. This aggregate information includes, but is not limited to, IP addresses connecting to our site, how many persons visited a particular page or activity, dates and times of image uploads, device characteristics, operating system, browser type, type of connection, page and image viewing statistics, and incoming and outgoing links.

    Like most websites, we use log files to store this information. None of this automatically collected technical information is associated with any identified person at the time it is collected, but it could be associated with you under two circumstances: First, if you choose to give us personal data about you as described above, the technical information we collect that would otherwise be anonymous could instead be logged as coming from you. Second, if we are required to disclose our server logs as a result of a subpoena or other legal process, some third party such as your internet provider could match our anonymous technical information with you, using information beyond what is found on our servers.

    Eluxe Magazine may use cookies, web beacons, pixel tags, or other anonymous tracking information to improve our server’s interaction with your computer, and we may partner with third party advertisers who may (themselves or through their partners) place or recognise a unique cookie on your browser. These cookies enable more customised ads, content, or services to be provided to you. To trigger these cookies, we may pass an encrypted or “hashed” (non-human readable) identifier corresponding to your email address to a Web advertising partner, who may place a cookie on your computer. No personally identifiable information is on, or is connected to, these cookies. Although our servers currently don’t respond to “do-not-track” requests (see below), you can block these cookies in other ways, for example by searching “[your browser] + disable cookies.”

    Eluxe Magazine will never share, sell, lease, or rent PII to unaffiliated third parties, except in the following circumstances:

    a) If we have a good faith belief that we must disclose such information for legal reasons, such as to enforce our Terms of Service, protect or assert the rights, property interests, or personal safety of Eluxe (including its employees, directors, suppliers, distributors, service providers, users of the Website or others), or if we are otherwise required to disclose such information by law. We will disclose information only to the extent necessary to comply with the purpose of the request.

    b) We may share aggregate, anonymous or summary information regarding our customers and their behaviors with partners, advertisers or other third parties. This data is not personal information and so will not identify you personally. We may share information with companies that provide support services to us, such as a printer, mailing house, fulfillment-company, credit card processor, email service provider or web host, amongst others. These parties may need personal information about you in order to perform their functions. However, these parties may not use any personal information we share with them about you for any other purpose other than in connection with performing supporting functions for us.

    You have the right at any time to prevent us from contacting you for marketing purposes. If and when we send a promotional communication to a user, the user can opt out of further promotional communications by following the unsubscribe instructions provided in each promotional e-mail. Please note that notwithstanding the promotional preferences you indicate by unsubscribing or opting out in some other fashion, we may continue to send you administrative emails including, for example, periodic updates to our Privacy Policy.

    In order to access a profile on Eluxe Magazine’s shop, you must first create an account with a username and password. The registration system requires that a valid email address be used to confirm the account. You should choose a username that does not include your last name and does not specify your city or your address. Eluxe Magazine asks that you use your first name only, or an alias, for your display name. This is to safeguard your privacy and protection. We do not use and cannot access this information.

    Eluxe Magazine is 100% opposed to unsolicited commercial email (“spam”). We do not have any desire to send unsolicited marketing emails to anyone without permission and we do not sell or provide user email addresses to any unauthorised third party in violation of this Policy. All of our newsletters and other general email marketing communications also include an “unsubscribe” opt-out link that you may use to tell us to stop sending you marketing emails.

    In the event of a change in control resulting from, for example, a sale to, or merger with, another entity, or in the event of a sale of assets or a bankruptcy, Eluxe Magazine reserves the right to transfer your personal information to the new party in control, or the party acquiring assets. We will only do so if the party we transfer the information to agrees that they will abide by our Privacy Policy for as long as they hold the information, and that they will not transfer the information to any other party who will not abide by our Privacy Policy.

    We use third-party advertising companies to deliver online advertising. These companies facilitate the delivery of ads, conduct market research, and use cookies for record-keeping purposes. These cookies sometimes enable the companies to serve you ads tailored to things you have shown an interest in based on your prior web activity. This is generally known as behavioral advertising. For example, this means that if you frequently read movie reviews online, it is possible that you might see ads on other websites relating to upcoming movies. Online advertising companies generally conduct this activity in an anonymous format, with online information not combined with information that would allow for your identification.

    The third-party companies that will be serving advertisements on Eluxe Magazine may include DoubleClick, Google and Taboola.

    We may periodically modify, alter, or update these policies. We will alert users to any material changes to this policy by posting the revised information here. We encourage you to review our Privacy Policy on a regular basis to stay informed about how we are protecting the personal information we collect. Your continued use of TGT’s website constitutes your agreement to this Privacy Policy and any future updates.