Accessories Fashion

Crazy for Coclico: Sustainable Shoes

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By Arwa Lodhi

Designer Sandra Canselier grew up in the French countryside, surrounded by the idyll of poppy fields, lavender and wildlife. Consequently, she grew up valuing the natural world that surrounds us, and has dedicated her life to making products that respect those values.

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The daughter and granddaughter of shoemakers, Canselier combined her ancestral knowledge with her love of nature, and created a sustainable shoe company called Coclico.

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Winner of the 2014 Source Awards for ethical footwear, Coclico plays with how the English pronounce ‘coquelicot’, or ‘poppy’ in French–the flower is dear to Canselier, as it evokes wonderful childhood memories. The brand uses accredited tanneries with an emphasis on vegetable-tanned leathers, which yield a unique patina with age.

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What’s more, natural components such as wood and cork are not a façade of the material– Coclico only uses these as solid, core materials, integral to the structure of the shoe.

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Organic linens, recycled cork for internal platforms, recycled foam, non-chrome leather lining and lead free / nickel free hardware are just some of the other eco-friendly products that go into the making of these fine shoes.

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Whenever possible, these components are sourced from regional suppliers, close to the production facility in Mallorca, Spain. This facility is noted for providing living wages, high safety standards, and environmental reliability.

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Today, Sandra may live in Brooklyn with her partner and their little girl, but she’s never forgotten the value of nature, and so she continues to do her best to ensure her daughter will grow up with a future full of fields of ‘coclicos’.

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